Archive for the ‘Animation’ Category

Hamtaro Game Now Available for iPhone, iPod and iPad

Posted 16 May 2011 — by Nicole P
Category Animation, Essay, Film Industry News

By Rachel Menendez Now kiddy and big kid favorite Hamtaro: Little Hamsters, Big Adventures is available on your iPhone, iPad and iPod through Viz Media.

Are you secretly a Hamtaro fan? You don’t have to be ashamed, plenty of us are. Now kiddy and big kid favorite Hamtaro: Little Hamsters, Big Adventures is available on your iPhone, iPad and iPod through Viz Media.

Through Viz Media you can get the Hamtaro game as an app for just $1.99 by visiting www.VIZ.com/apps.

The app features three colorful and original game environments and dozens of levels. The game is Facebook enabled and offers an interactive Game Center for posting personal and worldwide high scores. You can also unlock 9 exclusive Hamtaro wallpapers to further customize your iPhone. Read More

Gnomeo & Juliet

Posted 07 May 2011 — by contributor
Category Animation, Film Reviews, Movies I Didn't Get

By Scott Martin

Gnomeo & Juliet, UK / USA, 2011Gnomeo and Juliet Poster

Directed by Kelly Asbury

In what might become an anthem for the Gnome Liberation Front, Gnomeo & Juliet (very loosely) retells the story of William Shakespeare’s famed tragedy of nearly the same name. But, after all, a movie about doomed garden gnome love by any other name is still as dreadful. Oddly enough, a pastiche of Shakespeare puns and gardening jokes took nine writers – Andy Riley, Kevin Cecil, Mark Burton, Emily Cook, Kathy Greenberg, Steve Hamilton Shaw, Kelly Asbury, Rob Sprackling, and John R. Smith – to fully realize. That might be the funniest thing about the film. Between them, be it final touch-ups, penning the original stories, script drafts, or tossing in jokes here and there, they pulled off true movie magic: a film that feels like it has no screenplay at all, written by a small committee.

Most of us grew up knowing the story of Romeo and Juliet, and for the little kids who are for some reason seeing this film, a small gnome sets our scene: “Two gardens, both alike in dignity, in fair grass, where we lay our scene, from ancient grudge break to new mutiny, where civil dirt makes civil ceramic unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes a pair of star-cross’d gnomes pull through it all right; whose misadventured piteous overthrows do with their lame puns bury their parents’ strife. The fearful passage of their scuff-mark’d love, and the continuance of their parents’ rage, which, but their children’s end, nought could remove, is now the 86 minutes’ traffic of our stage; the which if you with patient ears attend, what here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.” And if you’ll buy that, I have a bridge I need to get off my hands. Baz Lurhmann’s take, 1996’s Romeo + Juliet, was rooted in gang violence in Southern California. That feud was believable. All other versions, we’re committed to going along with simply because they’re direct adaptations of the play. Here, we’re expected to believe several key things without batting an eye. Read More

Hop

Posted 25 Apr 2011 — by contributor
Category Animation, Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott Martin

Hop, USA, 2011

Directed by Tim Hill

Hop isn't half-bad, according to Scott Martin. For those who know me, it’s no secret that I usually find movies like this a bit deplorable. There’s just something about the live-action/animation hybrid that I can’t ever get behind. Be it Yogi Bear (2010), or the Scooby-Doo movies, or the Alvin and the Chipmunks films, I’m always reminded of the glory days when Roger Rabbit was king. But a lesson I learned from reading Roger Ebert prevails in these situations: you judge the movie for what it is and if it achieves what it set out to achieve. Hop is a film that does just that – it’s sweeter than candy, it’s a kid’s movie through and through, but it has enough in it for adults to enjoy. And the most enjoyable thing about the movie? The comedy isn’t once forced. Yes, there are pop culture references every now and then, but it’s all derived from the situation. And situational comedy is always the best option.

E.B., voiced by Russell Brand, is the son of the Easter Bunny (voiced by Hugh Laurie), and is about to be named as his replacement. Of course, E.B. doesn’t want this; he wants to be a drummer in a rock and roll band. An evil chicken named Carlos, voiced brilliantly by Hank Azaria, wants Easter for his own. Meanwhile, in the human world, Fred O’Hare (James Marsden) is a disappointment to his father, Henry (Gary Cole); he’s a twenty-something loafer who can’t seem to find the right job and needs to move out of his parents’ house. E.B. and Fred meet at just the right time in both their lives. What follows is a film not only about growing up, but growing into yourself in the process.

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The 83rd Annual Academy Awards – Some Thoughts

Posted 02 Mar 2011 — by Ezra Stead
Category Animation, Essay, Film Industry News, Hollywood Beat, Movies I Got

By Ezra Stead

James Franco and Anne Hathaway host the Oscars.

The 83rd Annual Academy Awards have now come and gone, and as usual, I have a few gripes. Nothing too unexpected happened, but you must understand this is my Super Bowl: an excuse to get drunk and yell at the TV each year, so I can’t help but complain a bit about some of what went down the morning (and the rest of the week) after. Please bear with me.

Last year, I dominated my friendly Oscar pool, with 18 out of 24 categories guessed correctly. By the time they got to the last four categories, it was mathematically impossible for anyone at the party I attended to beat me, and then I got those four categories right, too. I say that to say this: oh, how the mighty have fallen. Perhaps as a result of having bet against Roger Ebert in an online competition, and thereby allowing too much of his presumed wisdom to influence my choices, I failed miserably this year, with only 15 correct guesses. I did manage to outguess Ebert by one vote, but not quite as simply as that makes it sound: he picked Geoffrey Rush for Best Supporting Actor and I picked Christian Bale, who won; I also guessed correctly in the make-up category (Rick Baker and Dave Elsey for The Wolfman) while Ebert guessed Adrien Morot for Barney’s Version, but then he managed to get a point back in the Best Director category (more on that shortly). Read More

VIZ Media Announces Season Finale Of Nura: Rise Of The Yokai Clan

Posted 22 Dec 2010 — by Jason A. Hill
Category Animation, Anime, Film Industry News

By Jason A. Hill

NURA: RISE OF THE YOKAI CLAN Movies i didnt getVIZ Media has announced that the season one finale of the online streaming anime hit series NURA: RISE OF THE YOKAI CLAN will conclude on VIZAnime.com, the company’s premier website for anime, on December 27, 2010. Also announced is the manga (graphic novel) version of NURA: RISE OF THE YOKAI CLAN, which the anime is based upon. Created by Hiroshi Shiibashi, Vol. 1 will have its North American debut under the Shonen Jump imprint on February 1st 2011, is rated “T”™ for Teens and will carry an MSRP of $9.99 U.S. / $12.99 CAN.

While the day belongs to humans, the night belongs to yokai, supernatural creatures that thrive on human fear. Caught between these worlds is Rikuo Nura. He’s three-quarters human, but his grandfather is none other than Nurarihyon, the supreme commander of the Nura clan, a powerful yokai consortium. So, Rikuo is an ordinary teenager three quarters of the time, until his yokai blood awakens. Then he transforms into the future leader of the Nura clan, leading a hundred demons.

Hiroshi Shiibashi debuted in Japan in Business Jump magazine with the series, Aratama. NURA: RISE OF THE YOKAI CLAN is his breakout hit. He also worked as an assistant to manga artist, Hirohiko Araki, the creator of JOJO’s BIZARRE ADVENTURE (also published in North America by VIZ Media). Read More

VIZ Media Releases New Death Note: Black Edition

Posted 15 Dec 2010 — by Jason A. Hill
Category Animation, Anime, Film Industry News

By Jason A. Hill

death note black edition movies i didnt getNew Edition Of The Riveting Supernatural Crime Mystery Features A Larger Size And Added Full Color Pages

San Francisco, CA, December 13, 2010 – VIZ Media, LLC (VIZ Media), one of the entertainment industry’s most innovative and comprehensive publishing, animation and licensing companies, has announced the release of DEATH NOTE BLACK EDITION, an oversized version of the acclaimed supernatural crime thriller. Volume 1 hits stores on December 28th and includes the first two editions of the popular manga (graphic novel) series as well as added full-color pages. The DEATH NOTE BLACK EDITION will be offered under the Shonen Jump Advanced imprint, is rated “T+”™ for Older Teens, and will retail for $14.99 U.S. / $16.99 CAN.

Light Yagami is an ace student with great prospects – and he’s bored out of his mind. But all that changes when he finds the Death Note, a notebook dropped by rogue Shinigami death god. Any human whose name is written in the notebook dies, and now Light has vowed to use the power of the Death Note to rid the world of evil. But when criminals begin dropping dead, the authorities send the legendary detective L to track down the killer. With L hot on his heels, will Light lose sight of his noble goal … or his life? Read More

VIZ Media Animates The Holidays With A Special iTunes Promotion

Posted 15 Dec 2010 — by Jason A. Hill
Category Animation, Anime, Film Industry News

By Jason A. Hill

vis media movies i didnt getFREE Episodes Available Download-To-Own For Limited Time

VIZ Media celebrates the season with a special Download-to-Own promotion on the iTunes Store in the U.S. (www.iTunes.com), perfect to round out digital holiday gift lists to delight audiences young & old.

Just in time for the holidays, from now until February 1st, download for FREE the full first episodes for VAMPIRE KNIGHT, BLEACH, KEKKAISHI, and NARUTO SHIPPUDEN. All subsequent episodes are available to rent for only $0.99 each, or to own for only $1.99 each.

Please visit http://www.itunes.com/anime for complete details. Read More