Posts Tagged ‘Anchorman’

Horns – Don’t Ask Him About Hogwarts

Posted 15 Oct 2014 — by Ezra Stead
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Ezra Stead

Horns, USA / Canada, 2013

Directed by Alexandre Aja

Horns is a solidly compelling midnight movie anchored by a strong lead performance from Radcliffe, who hasn’t really strayed too far from his most famous role by playing another conflicted hero with magical powers and a dark past. The least interesting thing about Horns is its central plot, a standard murder mystery potboiler that finds Ig Perrish (Daniel Radcliffe) on a quest to prove his innocence in the brutal slaying of his longtime girlfriend, Merrin (Juno Temple). Where the film adaptation of Joe Hill’s novel really excels is in the memorable sequences along the road of Ig’s private investigation. Once he begins to grow the titular horns, everyone he encounters feels the irrepressible need to unburden themselves of their darkest secrets and most antisocial urges to him. He also finds that they will do whatever he tells them, or permits them, to do, and this often leads to hilariously bizarre results, including a massive anchorman fight, which I never thought I’d see again outside of the first two movies to do it.  Read More

Hashtag: Explain A Film Plot Badly

Posted 08 Sep 2014 — by Ezra Stead
Category Movies I Didn't Get

By Ezra Stead

Hashtag: Explain A Film Plot BadlyIn case you missed it, there was a fun little game trending on Twitter over the weekend, with the hashtag “Explain A Film Plot Badly.” It’s kind of similar to this old thing I wrote. Here are the ones I came up with, in order of when they were tweeted (answers can be found in the tags for this article, but I think you’ll get ’em all):

Kevin Spacey has a nice time drinking coffee and telling stories to a grumpy policeman.

Sigourney Weaver risks her life to save a cat.

Sam Neill learns to like children after being forced to keep two of them from being eaten. Read More

10 Sequels That Are (Arguably) Better Than The Original

Posted 27 Nov 2013 — by Ezra Stead
Category Essay, Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Ezra Stead

The Bride of Frankenstein is not only better than the original Frankenstein, but also the best of all Universal monster movies.We’re used to movie franchises being victim to diminishing returns, with the sequels to classic films generally lackluster at best (Ghostbusters II, Halloween II), and at worst, utter travesties that threaten to tarnish the legacy of the original (the Matrix sequels, The Godfather: Part III). On rare occasions, though, the second film in a trilogy or franchise (which I consider to be any series with more than three movies) actually surpasses the original in some way. Here are ten sequels that are, in some circles at least, considered better than the films that spawned them, and my thoughts on each.

10 Sequels That Are (Arguably) Better Than The Original1. THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935) – this is the one that got me thinking about the topic in the first place, and it’s also the oldest of the films discussed herein. James Whale’s follow-up to his 1931 hit, Frankenstein, ties up the loose end of Victor Frankenstein (Colin Clive) promising his monster (Boris Karloff) a bride to quell his loneliness. It also features most of the iconic images and dialogue associated with Universal Studios’ most famous monster, including Frank learning to smoke in the hut of the blind man he befriends (which was cemented in the public consciousness by Mel Brooks’ spoof of it in 1974’s Young Frankenstein). Bride’s expert blend of humor and pathos, as well as truly chilling moments such as Frank’s hollow, soulless intonation of the classic line, “I love dead,” make it not only better than the original Frankenstein, but also the best of all Universal monster movies. Read More