Posts Tagged ‘Drew Barrymore’

Going The Distance – Going For Need

Posted 04 Aug 2011 — by contributor
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott Martin

Going The Distance, USA, 2010 Drew Barrymore and Justin Long in New Line Cinema's romantic comedy Going The Distance, a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

Directed by Nanette Burstein

Some of us have experienced it, some of us have vowed to never go through it (once or again), some of us are doing it right now, but the fact is Nanette Burstein’s film might as well be “based on actual events.” It isn’t a film for everyone, hence its divisive critical reception, but for those of us who can connect, it serves as medicine for a most unique ailment: long-distance relationships. Some of them work, some of them crash and burn, but no matter what happens between the two loved ones, it’s a learning experience like none other. Burstein is a documentary filmmaker by trade, having only a few films, including The Kid Stays in the Picture (2002) and American Teen (2008), to her name. It’s always an interesting leap when a documentary director throws their hat into the ring to make a fiction film. I’m sure many of us long for the day when Michael Moore might make a buddy cop movie, but, until that (sure to be unfortunate) time comes, let’s look at what we have here. Read More

Scream 4

Posted 21 May 2011 — by Nicole P
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott MartinScream 4 movie

Scream 4, USA, 2011

Directed by Wes Craven

There are few things worth an eleven year wait, and I was on the fence about Scream 4, at least until the trailer came out. Ever since, I hopped off the fence and onto the bandwagon. I’ll admit that, while I’m a huge fan of the series, only the first Scream (1996) was worth anything until now. Scream 2 (1997) and 3 (2000), while loads of silly fun, are redundant and small compared to the original, which was a game changer for the horror scene at the time. Kevin Williamson’s screenplay is mostly to thank for that, as it dissected pretty much everything audiences then knew about modern horror movies, and again this year, Williamson took the genre back under the knife, grabbiing the clichés we see every weekend and turning them upside down. Make no mistake, this movie is pure formula; we’ve seen it already, hundreds of times. What makes it fun is Wes Craven’s approach to it. He’s still a master of suspense, after all.

It’s been a long time since Craven was the best horror director around; every director has their misfires. He won’t always direct movies like The Last House on the Left (1972) or Red Eye (2005), but it’s good to know that he still has it in him to pump out a solid thriller. Even lately, or at least since ’96, he’s displayed a genuine flair for comedy and being an actor’s director; maybe not in the strictest sense, but his actors are always having fun. Even in his lesser fare, like Cursed (2005), you can tell that the people involved are having a blast. What makes the Scream series so vividly entertaining, however, has always been the screenplays. Even when Kevin Williamson didn’t write Scream 3, his touch was all over it; he’s a smart writer with a flair for quick dialogue. Read More