Posts Tagged ‘Judd Apatow’

Going The Distance – Going For Need

Posted 04 Aug 2011 — by contributor
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott Martin

Going The Distance, USA, 2010 Drew Barrymore and Justin Long in New Line Cinema's romantic comedy Going The Distance, a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

Directed by Nanette Burstein

Some of us have experienced it, some of us have vowed to never go through it (once or again), some of us are doing it right now, but the fact is Nanette Burstein’s film might as well be “based on actual events.” It isn’t a film for everyone, hence its divisive critical reception, but for those of us who can connect, it serves as medicine for a most unique ailment: long-distance relationships. Some of them work, some of them crash and burn, but no matter what happens between the two loved ones, it’s a learning experience like none other. Burstein is a documentary filmmaker by trade, having only a few films, including The Kid Stays in the Picture (2002) and American Teen (2008), to her name. It’s always an interesting leap when a documentary director throws their hat into the ring to make a fiction film. I’m sure many of us long for the day when Michael Moore might make a buddy cop movie, but, until that (sure to be unfortunate) time comes, let’s look at what we have here. Read More

Scenechronize – The Efficient, Environmentally-Friendly Future Of Production

Posted 18 Apr 2011 — by Ezra Stead
Category Film Industry News, Hollywood Beat

By Ezra Stead

Scenechronize is revolutionizing the film production process.

Last month, marketwire.com covered the story of a $5 million dollar series B financing deal led by three private investors for the web-based production management system known as “scenechronize.” Scenechronize is the only system of its kind currently in use, and it is already streamlining the production process of numerous films and television series by eliminating the costly and wasteful practices employed in the industry up until now. Scenechronize provides automatic distribution of script changes, sides, call sheets, prep memos, location maps and other information previously relayed through phone calls, emails, memos and other forms of written communication in a time-consuming, inefficient process susceptible to mistakes. According to the San Francisco-based company’s CEO, Hunter Hancock, “scenechronize expedites and streamlines communications for the entire production, saving wasted time, significant amounts of money, and lots and lots of trees.” Read More

Paul

Posted 21 Mar 2011 — by contributor
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott Martin

Paul, Spain / France / UK / USA, 2011

Directed by Greg Mottola

Paul is the new feature from director Greg Mottola.

Paul is the simple story of an alien with an attitude and a heart of gold. In fact, the entire point of the film is so sweet that it seems almost impossible to believe that most of the film itself is crude, and partly cruel. Unlike Shaun of the Dead (2004) and Hot Fuzz (2007), which were helmed by Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost have brought us an eager “who said it” film filled with countless references and … political poignancy. All this, from Superbad (2007) and Adventureland (2009) director Greg Mottola. Mottola’s filmography is small, but consistent – he’s a comedian’s director with a lot of his own to say. That’s a form of direction I’ve always appreciated; the ability to let others shine while imbuing your own specific messages into the forefront. But here, Paul has mismatched its intent with its delivery. And that, in retrospect, hinders a positive remembrance of the film.

When I saw this film about a couple of weeks ago, I remember that I laughed throughout. It’s a funny, sharp, and deliriously rich comedy. With the talents of Pegg, Frost, and Mottola, we also get Bill Hader, Jason Bateman, Kristen Wiig, Sigourney Weaver, David Koechner, and Seth Rogen’s voice as the alien Paul. Outside of Pegg, Frost, Rogen, and Wiig, all of the other actors have borderline cameo roles, but are given enough material to stretch their legs and get the ball rolling. Read More

Gulliver’s Travels

Posted 03 Jan 2011 — by contributor
Category Film Reviews, Member Movie Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott Martin

Gulliver’s Travels, USA, 2010

Directed by Rob Letterman

Robert Letterman's Gulliver's Travels jack black movies i didnt getIn an effort to update and, in more than one sense of the word, modernize Jonathan Swift’s timeless novel, director Rob Letterman and his screenwriters Nicholas Stoller and Joe Stillman have crafted something unique, though distressingly blank. Here we have not the classic, epic story with which many have grown up, but rather a focus on the themes and ideas portrayed in Swift’s writing, and in a few underrated adaptations from days past. The story has always been a meditation on the measure of a man. The 1996 television version starring Ted Danson seemed to lose a bit of the magic of the novel in its translation from text to screen, but stories like this one are hard to tell; damn near impossible to get exactly right, if you consider the vision of the literature to be “exact.” With this one, though, starring the affable Jack Black, the sincere-beyond-all-reason Jason Segel, and the always wonderful Emily Blunt, we as the audience are treated to what contends to define “family feature.” Read More

Still Hard For Women Filmmakers

Posted 10 Nov 2010 — by contributor
Category Essay, Film Industry News, Hollywood Beat

By Rachel Menendez

elle women in hollywood power list 2010 movies i didnt getLast month, Elle magazine compiled its “Power List” of women in Hollywood. On this list, put together by Deadline.com’s Nikki Finke, were some notable mentions in Hollywood, ranging from the elite to the lesser known, but most notable to me was New York Times film critic Manohla Dargis. Dargis is a hero of mine, not only for her erudite knowledge of film but also for pointing out that, even in the wake of Kathryn Bigelow’s Best Director win for The Hurt Locker at last year’s Oscars, there is still a glass ceiling for women filmmakers in Hollywood. In an Article she wrote last year, she points out that there is still a lack of opportunities to produce the kind of success Bigalow has had.

Dargis is not attacking men, either; much of her anger is directed toward women in the industry. Hollywood is not just made up of misogynistic men, it’s filled with people who come from many backgrounds. Many people are involved in making decisions about who gets opportunities to show what they can do, and women are just as much a part of that. To boil this problem down to sexism would be an easy answer and just another reason for many women trying to make a career in film to give up, but as Dargis points out, the scarcity of opportunities for women is a legitimate problem and worth talking about.

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