Posts Tagged ‘slasher’

10 Sequels That Are (Arguably) Better Than The Original

Posted 27 Nov 2013 — by Ezra Stead
Category Essay, Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Ezra Stead

The Bride of Frankenstein is not only better than the original Frankenstein, but also the best of all Universal monster movies.We’re used to movie franchises being victim to diminishing returns, with the sequels to classic films generally lackluster at best (Ghostbusters II, Halloween II), and at worst, utter travesties that threaten to tarnish the legacy of the original (the Matrix sequels, The Godfather: Part III). On rare occasions, though, the second film in a trilogy or franchise (which I consider to be any series with more than three movies) actually surpasses the original in some way. Here are ten sequels that are, in some circles at least, considered better than the films that spawned them, and my thoughts on each.

10 Sequels That Are (Arguably) Better Than The Original1. THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935) – this is the one that got me thinking about the topic in the first place, and it’s also the oldest of the films discussed herein. James Whale’s follow-up to his 1931 hit, Frankenstein, ties up the loose end of Victor Frankenstein (Colin Clive) promising his monster (Boris Karloff) a bride to quell his loneliness. It also features most of the iconic images and dialogue associated with Universal Studios’ most famous monster, including Frank learning to smoke in the hut of the blind man he befriends (which was cemented in the public consciousness by Mel Brooks’ spoof of it in 1974’s Young Frankenstein). Bride’s expert blend of humor and pathos, as well as truly chilling moments such as Frank’s hollow, soulless intonation of the classic line, “I love dead,” make it not only better than the original Frankenstein, but also the best of all Universal monster movies. Read More

Friday The 13th (2009) – Why Not Just Close The Camp?

Posted 05 Jul 2011 — by contributor
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott Martin

Friday the 13th, USA, 2009

Directed by Marcus Nispel

Friday the 13th 2009 could be a considered an anti-drug PSA.Well, 29 years later, it was bound to happen: an attempt at a reboot of one of the most popular franchises in film history, taking in almost half a billion dollars worldwide. 11 films later, it still doesn’t make sense (even though there are twelve films, I say eleven, because I love the original), but, like most reboots, the director (here, Marcus Nispel of the 2003 Texas Chainsaw Massacre infamy) ignores the existing films and sets off to deliver his own interpretation of the story. Picking up where the original film left off (kinda), Nispel takes us on a CW-star packed, machete-wielding, goalie-masked roller coaster ride. But why? There’s no evidence to support the idea that the series needed a reimagining. It’s not like it’s Batman and Joel Schumacher had been dropping loads on it for a few years. Starting with Part 2 (1981), none of the films were ever very good. I liked a few of the sequels, particularly Part VIII: Jason Takes Manhattan (1989), but it’s not like the story ever got lost in transition. Jason stalks people, he kills people, he dies, he comes back next year to stalk and kill more people. How is that hard to get right? Read More

Friday The 13th (1980) – Everybody Looking Forward To The Weekend

Posted 03 Jul 2011 — by contributor
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott Martin

Friday the 13th, USA, 1980

Directed by Sean S. Cunningham

Friday the 13th - a film that delivers what it promises. Alfred Hitchcock created the genre: the “slasher” picture. It was 1960, and the film was Psycho. If we wanted to stretch that fact, we can claim that the original slasher film was a small, yet admittedly scary, film called Peeping Tom, directed by Michael Powell. It was released only a few months before Psycho, but didn’t have nearly the same impact on audiences, or critics. Psycho soared to the top, and Peeping Tom was left to be later rediscovered and revered. Hitchcock, without intention, birthed a new era of horror film that wouldn’t come into its prime until 1974 with the release of Bob Clark’s Black Christmas.

Black Christmas redefined what Hitchcock had started, and set the rules in stone: a mentally unhinged masked killer stalks attractive teens and picks them off, one by one, in creative ways. After Black Christmas, then came John Carpenter’s Halloween (1978), which cemented the popularity of the genre. After Halloween was a critical and financial success, studios ran with the idea that they could make money selling “dead teenager movies” (a term coined by Roger Ebert) to live teenagers. They were right, and in 1980, the first studio-backed slasher film was released. It was May 9th, and it was Friday the 13th. Read More

Scream 4

Posted 21 May 2011 — by Nicole P
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott MartinScream 4 movie

Scream 4, USA, 2011

Directed by Wes Craven

There are few things worth an eleven year wait, and I was on the fence about Scream 4, at least until the trailer came out. Ever since, I hopped off the fence and onto the bandwagon. I’ll admit that, while I’m a huge fan of the series, only the first Scream (1996) was worth anything until now. Scream 2 (1997) and 3 (2000), while loads of silly fun, are redundant and small compared to the original, which was a game changer for the horror scene at the time. Kevin Williamson’s screenplay is mostly to thank for that, as it dissected pretty much everything audiences then knew about modern horror movies, and again this year, Williamson took the genre back under the knife, grabbiing the clichés we see every weekend and turning them upside down. Make no mistake, this movie is pure formula; we’ve seen it already, hundreds of times. What makes it fun is Wes Craven’s approach to it. He’s still a master of suspense, after all.

It’s been a long time since Craven was the best horror director around; every director has their misfires. He won’t always direct movies like The Last House on the Left (1972) or Red Eye (2005), but it’s good to know that he still has it in him to pump out a solid thriller. Even lately, or at least since ’96, he’s displayed a genuine flair for comedy and being an actor’s director; maybe not in the strictest sense, but his actors are always having fun. Even in his lesser fare, like Cursed (2005), you can tell that the people involved are having a blast. What makes the Scream series so vividly entertaining, however, has always been the screenplays. Even when Kevin Williamson didn’t write Scream 3, his touch was all over it; he’s a smart writer with a flair for quick dialogue. Read More