Posts Tagged ‘Vera Farmiga’

The Lincoln Lawyer

Posted 11 May 2011 — by Nicole P
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Got

By Scott MartinThe Lincoln Lawyer movie

The Lincoln Lawyer, USA, 2011

Directed by Brad Furman

Consider it a John Grisham novel on steroids. Matthew McConaughey is adept at playing lawyers with an evident moral compass that they just choose to ignore. I remember the first time I saw A Time to Kill (1996) on television, and I was mostly just interested in seeing Sandra Bullock in something that wasn’t a frothy romantic comedy, but I left the film impressed mostly by McConaughey and his bittersweet performance. Fifteen years later, I’m reminded of why I like him as an actor in the first place. It’s not easy to get behind him when he comes out with films like Failure to Launch (2006), Surfer, Dude, or Fool’s Gold (both 2008), but in films like Contact (1997), Tropic Thunder (2008), or The Lincoln Lawyer, his considerable skill is put to better use. He is an actor, first and foremost, especially when he keeps his shirt on.

Mick Haller (McConaughey) is a defense attorney, and a damn good one. We’re not keyed in on his record of wins or losses, except for a few important ones, but I can imagine it’s somewhere comparable to 50-3. Even the license plate on his Lincoln sedan reads “NTGUILTY,” which is either a reminder to Haller himself that he earns an honest living, or just a mantra. He’s a drinker, and then some. You can imagine his southern charm being effective not only in the courtroom, but on the women he encounters, too. He’s genuine, but even that has its limits. Haller surrounds himself with clients and co-workers; outside of his ex-wife, Maggie (Marisa Tomei), and his private investigator, Frank (William H. Macy), I wonder if he has a true friend. The man’s clients consist of murderers, rapists, prostitutes, drug dealers - the type of roster any star defense attorney might have. Read More

Source Code

Posted 15 Apr 2011 — by contributor
Category Film Reviews, Movies I Didn't Get

By Scott Martin

Source Code, Canada / France / USA, 2011

Directed by Duncan Jones

Source Code is very reminiscent of Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys. This film has Terry Gilliam’s fingerprints all over it, especially those of the Gilliam who made Twelve Monkeys (1995). But, here, the closest we get to Brad Pitt’s rambling genius is Michelle Monaghan in an adorable outfit. Better, though, is the lead performance from Jake Gyllenhaal, who has grown to have an incredibly commanding screen presence. From back in the days of Donnie Darko (2001) up until now, he’s steadily been growing on me as an actor. Then, when Brokeback Mountain (2005) came around, it all just clicked and I became one of those “insta-fans,” never looking back. Donnie Darko still sucks, but at least the guy is watchable now.

Source Code is an interesting film, directed by Duncan Jones (recall Moon from 2009). A man wakes up on a train, not knowing who he is or why he’s there. Everyone aboard seems to know him, and he seems to have a thing going with the gorgeous girl sitting across from him. Eight minutes after all of this is established, they all die. The train explodes, and our man wakes up again in a capsule of sorts (or maybe a grave, existentially) with a voice coming to him from a television set telling him this – he’s a soldier, Captain Colter Stevens, and part of an intense new system referred to as “source coding,” in which he is to travel back into a tragic accident in order to discover both what went wrong and who to blame. Read More